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El gato negro

TitleEl gato negro

AuthorEdgar Allan Poe

Editing placeMadrid

EditorialEdiciones Generales Anaya

Year1983

Illustrator

Edition typeYouth edition (translation)

TranslatorDoris Rolfe

LanguageSpanish

LibraryFGM

Volumes1

Number of pages240

Size (in cms)19,5 x 13,5

Works included
A Descent into the Maelström
Berenice
Hop-Frog
Ligeia
MS. Found in a Bottle
The Black Cat
The Cask of Amontillado
The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar
The Fall of the House of Usher
The Pit and the Pendulum
The Premature Burial
The Tell-Tale Heart

Works illustrated
A Descent into the Maelström
Berenice
Hop-Frog
King Pest. A Tale Containing an Allegory
Landor´s Cottage
Lionizing
Morella
MS. Found in a Bottle
Portrait
Silence - A Fable
The Assignation
The Black Cat
The Cask of Amontillado
The Colloquy of Monos and Una
The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar
The Fall of the House of Usher
The Gold-Bug
The Masque of the Red Death
The Murders in the Rue Morgue
The Mystery of Marie Roget. A Sequel to ‘The Murders in the Rue Morgue’
The Pit and the Pendulum
The Premature Burial
The Tell-Tale Heart
William Wilson

Bibliographic referencesPOLLIN 217 (1032)

DescriptionFirst edition. Anthology of twelve stories included in the collection «Tus libros. Intriga». Translation by Doris Rolfe, introduction by Juan and Constantino Bértolo Cadenas, appendix by Constantino Bértolo Cadenas and guide to the illustrations by Carmen Bernárdez. It includes twenty-six black-and-white illustrations by Harry Clarke and Arthur Rackham, plus some ornamental vignettes, and a portrait of Poe engraved by Justo Barboza Colantonio. Aubrey Beardsley's «The Black Cat» illustration is reproduced in color on the cover.
Beardsley's illustration first appeared in Chicago: Herbert S. Stone and Company, 1894-95; Clarke's, in London: George G. Harrap and Co., 1919; and Rackham's, in London: George G. Harrap and Co., 1935.
«The illustrator has preserved and reflected the fundamental aspects of Poe's mystery writing: terror, agony and surprise at the unexpected; in short, the forces of the unknown and extraordinary. [...] Clarke's illustrations might be thought to be a mere decoration of the text: such is the exuberance of line and ornamental detail [...]. But on closer inspection, Poe's basic cues come through strongly. Although the image is unrealistically and even sophisticatedly treated, the great expressiveness of the figures is surprising, characters subjected to the most desperate terror» (Carmen Bernárdez, 236).

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